African-American Issues of 100 Years Ago


The magazine articles on this page were selected from the Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature, Vol. 4, 1915-18. They represent prominent African-American issues at that time, when many African-Americans from the rural south were migrating to northern cities, and when the U.S. entered World War I.

You can find all volumes of the Readers Guide up to 1922, along with other periodicals indexes, on the “Indexes to Periodicals” page of our Century Past Online Library. Links to many periodicals are found on the same page; just scroll up.



“The Race Problem”, Villard, Oswald Garrison, The Nation, Vol. 99, pages 738-40, Dec 24, 1914

“Race Segregation in the Rural South”, Weatherford, W. D., The Survey, Vol. 33, pages 375-7, Jan 2, 1915

“The Oklahoma Grandfather Clause Annulled”, Outlook, Vol. 110, pages 486-7, June 30, 1915

“End of the “Grandfather Clause”, The Literary Digest, Vol. 51 page 5, Jul 3, 1915

“Just a Few of the Ways in which the South will still Prevent Negroes from Voting”, Everybody’s Magazine, Vol. 33, pages 251-2, Aug 1915

“The South and the Negro Vote”, Hemphill, James C., The North American Review, Vol. 202, pages 213-19, Aug 1915

“Isolating the Negro”, Wehle, Louis B., The New Republic, Vol. 5, pages 88-90, Nov 27, 1915

“My View of Segregation Laws”, Washington, Booker T., The New Republic, Vol. 5, pages 113-14, Dec 4, 1915

“Negro Segregation Adopted by St. Louis”, The Survey, Vol. 35, page 694, Mar 11, 1916

“Negro-segregation in St Louis”, The Literary Digest, Vol. 52, page 702, Mar 18, 1916

“Gathering Clouds along the Color Line”, Baker, Ray Stannard, The Worlds’ Work, Vol. 32, pages 232-6, June 1916

“The Negro Migration”, The New Republic, Vol. 7, pages 213-14, Jul 1, 1916

“A Plea for the Negro as Public Servant”, Roof, Katharine Metcalf, The Outlook, Vol. 114, pages 223-4, Sept 27, 1916

“Education and Crime among Negroes”, The American Review of Reviews, Vol. 55, pages 318-20, Mar 1917

“Howard University Semi-centennial and Negro Education”, Aery, William Anthony, School and Society, Vol. 5, pages 377-8, Mar 31, 1917

“Reasons Why Negroes Go North”, The Survey, Vol. 38, pages 226-7, June 2, 1917

“Farm Training for Negroes: The Essential Factor in Colored Education in the South”, The Survey, Vol. 38, pages 267-8, June 23, 1917

“The Passing of “Jim Crow””, Du Bois, W. E. Burghardt, The Independent, Vol. 91, pages 53-4, Jul 14, 1917

“Welcoming Southern Negroes: East St. Louis and Detroit – a Contrast”, Leonard, Oscar, Part 1. “The East St. Louis Pogrom”; Washington, Forrester B., Part 2. “The Detroit Newcomers’ Greeting”, The Survey, Vol. 38, pages 331-3, July 14, 1917

“East St. Louis Race-riots”, The Literary Digest, Vol. 55, pages 10-11, July 14, 1917

“The Riots in East St. Louis”, Pan American Magazine, Vol. 25, pages 173-4, August 1917

“Negro Migration as the South Sees It”, The Survey, Vol. 38, page 428, Aug 11, 1917

“Lynching and Race Relations in the South”, Page, Thomas Walker, The North American Review, Vol. 206, pages 241-50, Aug 1917

“The Negro Soldier under Fire in France”, The American Review of Reviews, Vol. 56, pages 315-16, Sep 1917

“Our Tyranny over the Negro”, The Literary Digest, Vol. 55, page 34, Sep 22, 1917

“A Momentous Decision”, The Nation, Vol. 105, page 526, Nov 15, 1917

“The Negro’s Brighter Outlook”, The Nation, Vol. 105, pages 627-8, Dec 6, 1917

“Can the Negro be Educated?”, Abbott, Lyman, The Outlook, Vol. 117, pages 602-4, Dec 12, 1917

“Unconstitutional Segregation”, Baldwin, William H. Jr., The New Republic, Vol. 13, pages 345-6, Jan 19, 1918

“What the Negro is Doing to Help Win the War”, The Literary Digest, Vol. 58, pages 39-40, Jul 27, 1918

“The Negro Problem in the U.S.”, Elliott, L.E., Pan American Magazine, Vol. 27, pages173-82, Aug 1918